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The Chance To Be Me 

I wrote this poem yesterday for National Coming Out Day to give my view as to why a day I wish didn’t need to exist is still actually necessary.  This is day for taking steps and having that conversation you know the one you’ve wanted to have with a college. friend or family member but never quite got round to or maybe it’s about them saying to you it’s okay I’m on your side and dont worry everything’s going to be fine. After a lot of consideration I have decided to title this poem The Chance To Be Me as that is what coming out gives to so many people the chance to tell the world this is who I am . I hope you enjoy the read.

The Chance To Be Me 

On national coming out day 

no doubt some people will say 

why does it matter 

well let me explain 

coming out matters so that no one will ever need to be ashamed

of who they are or who they are attracted to 

but it’s political correctness gone mad 

or so we’re told by those who claim 

being LGBT is a lifestyle choice 

when we try to voice our concerns 

at this myth 

we are told to sit down , stay silent 

think ourselves lucky we are tolerated

we should be grateful for this 

but kissing our partners in public 

that’s not on nor will it ever be 

tabloid press and TV decide the way society is mirrored 

yet for so long we were only bit parts in the stories narrated through soaps and plays 

those days are the days some people yearn for 

ignoring the fact that many a secret was hidden behind the net curtains 

people were hurting unable to be who they were

ask yourself is that the kind of country you want to live in 

where people are labelled and suppressed

because of who they love.

or that some of us dress diffently 

from what’s considered normal

by those with the biggest stake in society 

who preach sobriety whilst living alternate realities

they have the wealth and means to disguise 

coming out matters because it puts an end 

to lying  just for the sake of others

it’s about discovering yourself 

and having the right to be who you really are. 

coming out means I can go to church

or walk in to that bar as the woman I am 

there is no longer a need to pretend

to be someone I’m not or never will be 

I am still the same person you’ve always known

 I still write poetry and hate snobbery and inequality in all forms 

do not be afraid to talk to me 

or ask any questions you feel you must 

trust me to be honest in my answers 

know that I will speak my truth and own it 

coming out as trans was the best thing I have ever done 

it was the moment I stopped running away from myself 

and admitted who I was, am, and ever shall be 

It gave me the chance to be me 

and that’s why on this day and every day 

coming out matters and it matters more than you think

© Gayle Smith 2017

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That’s Nice

This is a poem on that conversation that most poets will have had at least once in our lives when we’ve told a neighbour we’re going to a poetry night. I’ve given it the title That’s Nice as that’s the reply we are so often met with in that most awkward of moments but I’ve found more than once if you allow the conversation to flow there may come a moment when a light comes on and you change their perception of poetry. I hope you enjoy the read. 
That’s Nice

Whenever I’ve told someone I was going to a poetry night

I’ve been met with a standard reply  like that’s nice 

it’s good to have a hobby it helps pass the time 

the person is usually  trying to be polite 

but there struggling for something to say

there conversational ability limited 

by the fact they think Stanza is that team 

Celtic or Rangers beat a few years ago 

they even tried to name their star players 

I am greeted by blank stares when I add to their confussion 

by telling them Stanza has nothing to do with football

and is in fact a poetic form which poets use in our work

it’s like rhyming couplets I explain 

as the rain comes down from the heavens 

I attempt to make a run for it 

telling them that I need to be there by seven

even though the event doesn’t start till eight 

I need time to prepare my set 

they seem surprised that a neighbour they know 

will be on stage performing in front of an audience 

Oh I thought you were going to a reading 

maybe something to do with Burns 

I didn’t think you would be one of the turns 

so they ask  do you think  that poetry is for the likes of us 

of course I reply still smiling at the question 

well it showed a neighbourly interest in somebody from their community 

and that features strongly in my work 

I say I’ll let them know how the night went 

as I make a run for an oncoming bus 

it’s goes well that night it usually does

there was a good crowd the place was buzzing

as for my poems well what can I say 

I read them well my set went okay

but on the journey home I contemplate 

the events of an enjoyable evening 

and do you know my greatest achievement

It wasn’t the compliments I got from some well respected peers 

on my latest poems I had just debued 

it was that chat on my way to the bus stop

where I changed the way someone viewed my art 

I’m a girl from the schemes

who speaks from the heart

and see if by doing that I can open just one mind to poetry

as my neighbour would say that’s nice

that really is nice 

© Gayle Smith 2017 

As A Poet Talked Of His Mother’s Faith And The Dread Of A Black Forever A Musical Minstrel Made Memories As He Told Of An Amber River

There are sometimes when I really can’t believe how quickly passes and one of these times is when I write up my review of the previous edition of Words and Music . It seems like only yesterday I was preparing to welcome to our wee Tin Hut and now it’s time to tell you about the events of an very enjoyable and entertaining evening when we welcomed both old and new friends to our club . The fact I’m doing it two days after our October meeting is due a combination of a very busy life and my haphazard style of organising my notes 

At the clock struck 8 it was time to get under way. Since this was first night since the fringe I decided to kick off with Jewel Of The Clyde which is my take the events of 1990 when Glasgow was European city of culture.

Having done my duty it was now time to introduce the billed readers to the stage. First up was Susan McKinstry who though a recent addition to our team is a very welcome one. Susan read two poems Tolerance and Intimidation and both were excellently delivered by a writer with something to say about the state of both our nation and values. While I enjoyed both poems I particularly liked  tolerance as far from being what many people aspire to as the benchmark of democracy Susan explained in a carefully crafted way that tolerance should be the least we expect of others in a civilised society and that acceptance of others rather than merely tolerating them is the key to building the fairer more inclusive country we say we want to see.

As one Susan returned to join the company another took her place on stage and Susan Milligan performed two pieces Cats and Holiday In Heaven both of which had that quirky humour which has become Susan’s trademark. As usual Susan finished her set with a song. In this case the song of choice was The Carpenters classic Don’t You Remember You Told Me You Loved Me Baby after which she went back to her seat to enjoy the rest of the evening.

After two writers called Susan the next performer also had a similar sounding name and it was a pleasure to welcome Suzanne Egerton back to the stage for the first time since March having been absent from the company to a combination of holidays, hillwalking, and hospital appointments. I have to stress at this point that the hospital appointments were in no way related to either the holidays or the hillwalking . Anyway it was great to see her back where she belongs . Unusally for Suzanne,she started her set with a poem on growing older entitled No Mauve . This was followed by the tale of A Curious Incident At The Falkirk Wheel she then read a poem on hillwalking which she described is the lot of the older lesbian titled I Loved A Girl Wandering, before concluding her set with a story titled Autumal which was both enjoyable and appropriate since we were now in what the romantic poets described as the season of mists and mellow fruitfulness. 

As Suzanne went back in to the body of the kirk,  it was time to welcome our first male reader of the night and Jim Ewing would take us to the bar break with a set of three poems Granny Barbour, Orange, and a poem on suicide written in memory of the late Catherine Walker titled  It Is Never The Only Solution. In this the final poem of his set Jim appealed to anyone harbouring these thoughts to speak to someone who may be able to help them and this seemed the appropriate time and place to take a break and enjoy the company of those in the gathering including what looked like half of Skelmorlie who had come up to support our featured musician Billy Pryce. 

It was due to half of Skelmorlie turning up for Billy and the cooperation of our featured writer Adam V Cheshire that I was able to make an intelligent adaptation to the programme and reverse the featured slots to suit the needs of the many not the few as some of the Skelmorlie crowd had to return earlier than they would have liked. This meant that instead of the featured writer kicking off the second half of the evening that task would on this occasion fall to the featured musician and as a seasoned Words And Music regular though he was making his first apperance at The Tin Hut , Billy delievred in the way I knew he would. 

Billy started his set with an old favourite of mine Spontaneous Acts Of Sorrow,  before moving on to Beautiful Suit. This was followed by  songs which could be considered ever so slightly topical and both The Invisible Hand, and Drones, have powerful messages contained within the lyrics.  After this Billy (Pictured Below) went for a change of dirrction with the more gentle Autumn Song. This was followed by Keep Talking, and the brilliant Amber River which has not only a beautiful  melody but stunning lyrics which move me every time I hear them. He concluded his set with Cats Contentment and showed why he’ll always be welcome at Words And Music and valued member of our family.

( Our Featured Musician Billy Pryce makes a welcome return to Words And Music as he enjoys his first appearance at The Tin Hut since we took up residence in our new venue in June 2016)


Having waited patiently for his turn in the spotlight it was time for our featured writer Adam V Cheshire to share his thoughts with us and he certainly gave us plenty to think about in a passionate and powerful set which that a featured set doesn’t need to mean a lot of poems if as he and Billy did you place the accent on quality rather than quantity. Adam who made history by being our first Welsh featured act in the 27 years of Words and Music started  his set by drawing on his roots with My Mother Is A Christian. This poem in which he talks with openess and candour about his mother’s life and how her faith has helped her through difficult times and how despite his own lack of belief he will still go to church with her on Christmas Day. In his next poem Poetry Is,  Adam (Pictured Below) gives his personal insight in to what poetry means to him and explains his relationship with it. Adam then moved on to a poem on Mental Health Issues with particular reference to depression  entitled The Pining Dread Of A Black Forever. This is a topic on which Adam has very intimate and personal kbowledge and this really comes home in as  authentic voice as you’ll hear on what has always been and always will be a highly emotional issue.

Adam V Cheshire makes history at the Tin Hut by becoming the first Welsh featured Writer in the 27 years of Words And Music. 


Adam finished his set with a brilliant polemic on capitalism titled Capitalism Is Eating Itself Alive. In this amazingly well thought rant our poet puts capitalism the world’s most globally  powerful economic system in the dock and makes a compelling case for the prosecution. This was a top class set from a quality poet and a principled compassionate man. A man I was proud to have at our club.  

After two great featured sets it Claire McCann who had the difficult shift of following them and she gave it her best shot performing a piece called Chalk before rejoining the company.

With all the billed readers having performed it was up to me to bring the evening to a close which I did with a set of four poems. I started with Ten Days,  a poem on  both the ski similarities and differences of two girls born only ten days apart. The two girls in question were myself and Princess Diana who was only ten days my senior .

I followed this up with Glasgow Boy,  a poem in memory of the late Glasgow folk singer Ian Davidson who died last Christmas and who for many years was a Words And Music stalwart gracing our stage on many occasions when the event was held at Sammy Dow’s.  As those of you who knew Ian will know he was a principled man of the left and campaigned fervently for CND so I’m sure he would have enjoyed my penultimate poem of the evening which used a combination of comedy and feminism to make the case against neuclear weapons in Tights Before Trident.  This poem in which I look at things from the legally blonde school of economics shows why we should focused on a millon little things rather than wasting money on an expensive white elephant. Well little things contribute to the  economic well being of the country whereas neuclear weapons only contribute to destrucstion of global civilisation and could bring about the end of the world as we know it.

I concluded my set and the night with a poem which was written about one of my favourite events at the Edinburgh fringe. The event is an alternative caberet which caters for those acts you won’t see too often on mainstream bills which is why it is called Other Voices and funnily enough so is the poem with which I brought the curtain down on this edition of Words And Music. 

You know after the excitment of Edinburgh and the fringe the September edition of Words And Music is a welcome reality check as it’s good to get back in to the routine of attending local events , especially when it’s my responsibility to host the night. Though it is seldom one of our busiest 2014 being the obvious exception it has that relaxing atmosphere that lets you know your home and whoever said 13 was an unlucky number wasn’t at a night where a poet talked of his mother’s faith and the hole of a black forever and a musical minstrel made memories as he told of an Amber River. 

Till next time 

Gayle X

As Poets Told Stories Of Martian Transvestites And Men With Contrarian Blues A Song Told Us All We Had No Need To Fear We Wouldn’t Get One Star Reviews

As we return from the madness of what will forever be the fringe and get ready for the September edition of Words And Music, It’s time to look back on the events of August night which set me up well for the upcoming fringe. With Andy Fleming and Susan Milligan lined up for the featured slots I was ready for a night to remember and it was with an open heart and mind that we welcomed both old friends and new to our wee Tin Hut we call home.

As always I kicked off the night with of my own poems and in this case I selected  my tribute to David Bowie A Vote Of Thanks To A Martian Transvestite as this was how my mother first described Bowie a man whose music she would come to admire in my pre teen years of the early 1970’s.

Job done it was time to call the first of our billed readers and Mary Wilson read three poems By The By Bucketful, Have A Nice Day, and Happy Days before returning to take her place among the gathering. 

After Mary it was the turn of one of rising stars of the spoken word scene Angie Strachan to share her thoughts  and musings and believe me the self styled queen of modern suburbia entertained us in that unique way that only she can. Angie started her set in a way only a mammy can with Fat, a brilliant and emotional poem her  daughter Chloe over her concerns regarding body image and why a mother’s love is and will always be unconditional. This was followed by her election poem Ma Dug Is Better Than Your Dug in which she expresses all too clearly her frustration with all the petty points scoring which is or at least seems to be the lot of election campaigns these days. Angie concluded a thoroughly enjoyable set with Random Temptations her poem in praise of her favourite supermarket which for those of you who don’t know just happens to be Aldi. This is one of these poems which is always enjoyable to listen to and shows that even the self ordinary activities can provide inspiration. 

Next up was Peter Russell. Like Angie, Peter is a poet whose work I really enjoy. On this occasion  he started with Prohibitions By Order in which he expresses his concerns for humanity and the direction of political traffic. He followed this by performing Contrarian Blues. In this poem Peter laid out the five arguments he had with himself during the course of a day. Being a political animal myself I  love this poem as it reminds me of someone I see  every time I look in the mirror. From politics Peter moved on to music and in particular Jazz which has always been a passion of his with a poem entitled What I Know About Modern Jazz , The Bird, The Train, And Getz. He continued the jazz theme in his next poem Kinda Blue which was written for another of his heroes Miles Davis, before finishing a very entertaining set with Whose That Knocking At The Door.

As Peter returned to his seat it was the turn of Alex Frew to take the stage. As regular readers will know Alex often uses humour as a weapon to make his point  and he did so again in the second of his two pieces. In his first piece however Alex showed that when it matters he can be serious with his story Careless In The Community in which he highlights the issues facing the most vulnerable members of our society.For  his second piece Alex performed a  tongue in cheek song I Got A Silver Cape about his experience of working in social care and demonstrated the truth of the age old saying if you don’t laugh you’ll cry. Fortunately he chose the first of those options to make some very important points and I for one am glad he did so. 

After Alex , Claire McCann stepped up for her five minutes on stage and performed a song entitled Devon Remix. Claire, was followed by Derek Read whose poem A Quiet Land spoke of the sectarian tensions this Whirral lad witnessed growing up  in the Merseyside of the 1960’s . This poem  has always been one of my favourite pieces of Derek’s work as the story very similar to my own and shows that the sectarian problem of the July of the Ulster  marching season has impacted on other areas of mainland Britain and is not unique to Scotland. 

As Derek returned to his seat it was with great pleasure I welcomed back Suzanne Egerton to the Tin Hut for the first time since March as a combination of holidays and hospital appointments meant she had been unable to take her place among us. On reading her story Conked Out Suzanne reminded us what we’d been missing and that was a quality performer and  fantastic storyteller who has a natural way with words  

After Suzanne’s welcome return it was time to welcome a new face to our night and though Robert Neill was known to me from nights at the Kilmarnock edition a few years back this was his first appearance at the Tin Hut and he gave one of the performances of the night as he took to the bar break in style by performing four pieces all of which I found very enjoyable listening Robert started his set  with a break up poem Ayrshire style titled You Left Me For The Man That Works The Road.  This was followed by a song titled Fascist Girlfriend , in which he laments the idea of abyone ever going out with someone with such dodgy political views. He then movved on to a poem entitled Beep Beep before concluding his set with a brilliant take on the latest time lord or should that be time lady shenanigans in Doctor Who’s A Women Noo in which he muses on the fuss being made by some of the whovian fraternity about a development most of us would call progress. 

After an excellent first half and the chance to catch up with friends at the bar break it was time for our featured writer and this month it was Andy Fleming who was given the task of entertaining the company and he  duly did so by performing  his own brand of Words And Music as only he knows how.

Andy started  his set  with two pieces written for past McGonagall suppers  and since they both have incredibly long titles which I can’t actually remember off by heart I will say that I enjoyed them both and both contained references to vegetarianism. 

Having established his vegetarian credentials with his opening poems Andy (Pictured Below)  then established  his musical ones with his song Middle Aged Part Time Punk. This followed by Too Bad,  and the song which describes every fringe performers nightmare One Star Review. Having reminded me why I’ve never yet taken a show  to Edinburgh Andy moved on through his repitoire with I’ve Been To Places, City Of Strange Delights, Everybody Knows, and The Party Dress before concluding his set with one of his classic songs as he took us on a visit to The Pound Shop and like the pound shop Andy  is very good value who will  never get a one star review from me . Well let’s be honest the man is  a five star performer and Words And Music regulars know it.

Picture (1) Our featured, writer Andy Fleming


As our featured writer went back to his seat it was time for our featured musician to have their time in the spotlight and in Susan Milligan we had someone who loves to sing and is particularly fond of songs she heard growing up. Susan (Pictured Below) started her set with a  song which I must confess I hadn’t heard before called I Begged My  Mum To Stay before moving on to more familiar territory with The Carpenters classic from the 1970’s Don’t You Remember You Told Me You Loved Me Baby.

Picture (2) Our featured musician Susan Milligan 


 Susan followed this with the Marianne Faithful hit As Tears Go By and the Perry Como song For The Good Times which was a favourite of my dad’s  and wasn’t easy to listen to but I thanked Susan for singing it at the end of her set. For her penultimate song Susan  stayed with the ballads and  performed Help Me Make It Through The Night which was made famous by Gladys Knight and The Pips. This is a real power ballad and Susan put everything in to it and gave a cracking performance of a song which isn’t really in her natural style. Susan finished what was a very entertaining and enjoyable set with what I consider to be her signature song Rock And Roll Waltz which was originally made famous in 1950’s by American singer Kay Starr . On this night however  it was Susan who starred on the Words and Music and gave her best performance to date in the six years she’s been attending the event. 

After our two excellent featured acts there was only one thing left to do and that was for me as the last poet standing to bring the night to its conclusion. I did this by performing a set of four poems starting with my fiercest poem of all and for those of you who don’t get the reference the poem was The Lemon Dress which is the one I performed at the Women With Fierce Words event at the Scottish Poetry Library on the opening day of last year’s Edinburgh fringe.

I followed  this up by reading Two Rolls On Sausage , a poem on the challenges faced by people with Mental Health Issues. For my penultimate poem I switched the focus to activism and read Frontline a poem on the power of protest marches and the role they’ve played in my life. For my final poem Our Stories,  I stuck with activism but this time it had an LGBT theme to it as I told the story of my coming out and  the importance of pride especially during the early years of my transition.
With my set completed  I thanked everyone for their attendance and 12 happy campers made our way in to the night ready for whatever challenges this festival month would bring our way and as poets told tales of Martian Transvestites and men with contrarian blues a  song told us all we had no need to fear we wouldn’t get one star reviews 

Till next time 

Gayle X 

Daughters Of The Muse 

As regular readers will know, I  am a spoken word poet and early last August I was proud to be part of an event which though I didn’t know it at the time would completely change my life. The event in question was  women with fierce words in which those participating were encouraged to bring a fierce word to the Scottish Poetry Library to describe something relating to the poem they had chosen to read. This event then took on a life of its own as we became a fierce tribe and now just over a year later we have collated the poems of the day into an anthology and on Monday Lesley Traynor who was the driving force behind the event was interviewed on the Janice Forsyth show on Radio Scotland. In this poem which I have titled Daughters Of The Muse I give my reaction to the interview and the pride I feel on  being part of this wonderfully talented group of women . I hope you enjoy the read. 
Daughters Of The Muse 

A woman is interviewed 

about a new poetry collection

which the interviewer called
an exciting new development

before asking how it came about 

the women replied it was the result a challenge

to produce a piece of art in a day 

needless to say she rose to the occasion

and inspiration struck 

she asked poets to bring a  fierce word 

to the courtyard of the Scottish Poetry Library 

a word which empowered them

 or made them feel good about themselves 

as a starting place to introduce their poem

though all poets were invited only women replied 

what began as an event quickly morphed into a tribe 

as sisterhood showed its power

friendships forged that Friday afternoon

have matured and blossomed as we’ve celebrated each success

from Emma’s novel  to the launch of  Carla’s spoken word event 

we are not the type of women to rest on laurels 

we are daughters of the muse 

as we proved when we signed fierce words on canvas 

to become our art 

our creation 

we are an inspiration to others 

who will follow in our paths 

and now we have this collection 

as a memory of the day  

a day we tackled the task of rising to the challenge we faced 

and accomplished it by making  words our art 

@ Gayle Smith 2017

Other Voices

A long time ago in a haunted banqueting hall I promised Fay Roberts a poem. For those of you who don’t know who Fay Roberts is allow me to culturally enlighten you.  You see not only is Fay a valued mentor and friend, she also hosts Other Voices every year at the PBH free fringe and Other Voices which gives a platform to LGBT and other performers who are under represented on the bills on mainstream poetry nights is one of my favourite spoken word events not  just at the Edinburgh fringe but anywhere. So with this in mind  I made Fay a promise to write a poem to say in  my words what other voices means to me and I’m delighted to say that promise has now been honoured with this poem which strangely enough entitled Other Voices I hope you enjoy the read. 

Other Voices

Other voices 

far away from mainstream stages

come see us performing without fear 

poets who identify as LGBT 

some who proclaim boldly 

their queer or non binary status,

love us or hate us come and see us first 

before making your decision on how we should be perceived

we have stories to share with you

some of which you would never believe

listen to our words let us woo you 

with our tales of adventure, heartbreak, love, and lust 

place your trust in us to be your guides

in the majestic underground cave 

that is our spiritual home 

at this crazy time of year

come and see us perform without fear

far away from mainstream stages 

hear the sage advice that you will never give yourself  

it may even be good for your mental health 

and make you start a poetic journey of your own 

on the other hand you might just become 

a regular audience member 

we have no agenda except to entertain 

listen to us seduce  your ears with sentences 

rapped with rhyme and reason 

and delivered with the rhythm method 

we will pepper the air with salty phrases

if the need arises

 but should that be the case 

 it will be done with style 

we will make you think, cry and smile

 as we provide you with an hour of fun filled frivolity

in the banqueting hall of Madame Fay’s boudoir 

and when you see the brightest stars

the stars that  will dance but never lie 

when you are mesmerised by  them in an evening sky 

long after the show you came to see 

you will hear the cry of the banshee

and when you least expect it 

 you will remember us 

© Gayle Smith 2017 

In Memory Of Catherine Walker 

On the evening of Sunday the 23rd of July  just after 9 PM I was scrolling down my Facebook feed when I saw a message from my friend Marc Sherland. This post left me both shocked and saddened as it told me of the death of our friend and fellow poet Catherine Walker who had been found dead in her flat earlier that day by Marc and another friend from the writers community of which Catherine was an important part , Stephen Smith. Marc and Stephen had made the discovery at around 1 PM on Sunday afternoon at a time when most of us would be enjoying social time with friends and family. Catherine Walker was only 55 years old. 

This picture shows Catherine relaxing at a friend’s barbecue 


Naturally Catherine’s unexpected death has come as a shock to all her many friends in the poetry community and beyond and many poets have  paid warm and affectionate tributes to her expressing their sadness at a the loss of an excellent poet and an even better woman. Her loss pains us all and to those of a similar vintage is a sharp remainder that our light can be  extinguished at any time and makes us all to aware of our mortality. 

It was her compassion for all inhabitants of our planet which made Catherine a keen environmentalist and eventually a vegetarian, but anyone who thinks that these beliefs would make this softly spoken poet one of the tweed and twee brigade whose poems could be dismissed, as airy fairy could not be further from the truth. It is my opinion that her Christmas poem Santa’s on minimum wage is one the most biting satirical critiques I have ever heard on the impact of austerity. 

Amongst the facts  I would never have known about Catherine was that she was a skilled amateur mathematician and was once married to a driving instructor and despite passing her test never drove and was as Marc readily confirms one of the most nervous passengers he has ever driven. 

It saddens me as it will many  others  that a woman of Catherine Walker’s talent has no volume of her  work to leave as her legacy. This was at least in part due to the fact that Catherine, a shy and on occasion nervous woman lacked belief to see, what others who knew her work  would describe as her considerable abilities. 

This was due to be rectified as Marc  Sherland had been  due to publish a book of her poetry sometime this year . However  in January Catherine requested that he put it on hold as she had lost faith in her poetic voice. A modest woman with more talent than she ever knew  her loss will be deeply felt by all whose lives she touched but perhaps most keenly by Marc Shetland who she viewed as her non biological brother and whose family she adopted as her own 

For those who wish to celebrate Catherine’s life there will be a gathering at The Blue Chair Cafe 85 High Street on Wednesday the 2nd August from 7 to 10 PM 

My Thanks go to Marc R Sherland for his assistance with this task 

Till next time 

Gayle X 

This post was first published on Mumble Words on 31/07/2017